Bettye Lavette at Mountain Stage - 2003
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Playlist for Week after July 6, 2012

Original Show Date  - September 15, 2011

HourArtistSong
1Mary Flower & Pat DonohueRiver Of Joy
Too Gone
Would You Like To Play The Guitar
Grand Marais Blues
Michael JohnsonJust Because You Didn’t Answer
Old Fashioned Love
Blew By You
Lindsay MacCry, Cry, Cry
Best Of Me
7 Stones
2Cheryl WheelerPop Tarts & Spam
Little Lovely Thing
The Potato Song
Alice
Lady Gaga’s Singing Program
John GorkaWhere No Monuments Stand
I Think Of You
If These Walls Could Talk
Just Like A Woman
Ignorance & Privilege
Larry Groce & Co.Highway 61 Revisited
Press Release

For the Tenth Anniversary of Unplugged, North House presents
a rich array of musical opportunity: three nights and three concerts.
Two shows will be with NPR's featured radio show Mountain Stage
(Thursday and Friday nights), and the classic Saturday night Unplugged
performance features inspiring singer and songwriters.

 

John Gorka - Winner of the Kerrville Folk Festival’s prestigious ”New Folk” award in 1984, John Gorka remains one of the Northeast’s most acclaimed singer/songwriters. Lauded by “Rolling Stone” as “the preeminent male singer/songwriter of the new folk movement,” Gorka’s songs have been recorded by Mary-Chapin Carpenter, Mary Black, Maura O’Connell and Nanci Griffith. His 1994 release, “Out of the Valley,” featured cameos by Carpenter, Kathy Mattea, Leo Kottke, and Fairport Convention drummer Dave Mattacks while on 2001's “The Company You Keep,” he was joined by Carpenter, Ani DiFranco, Lucy Kaplansky and Patty Larkin. “So Dark You See,” his 11th recording, was released in 2009. Gorka has also released a collector’s edition box set featuring a hi-definition DVD and companion CD titled “The Gypsy Life.” Windham Hill released a greatest hits collection “Pure John Gorka.” His song “Where No Monument Stands” was featured in the documentary “Every War Has Two Losers” about activist Oregon Poet Laureate William Stafford. 

  

Cheryl Wheeler - A consummate entertainer and natural storyteller, singer/songwriter Cheryl Wheeler alternately pens some of the most alluring ballads on the folk scene - and some wittiest social satires including “Is It Peace Or Is It Prozac?” and “Does The Future Look Black?” Wheeler’s songs have been covered by artists ranging from Kenny Loggins, Garth Brooks and Suzy Bogguss to Bette Midler, Maura O'Connell and Kathy Mattea. She tours extensively, often performing solo or with Kenny White. She appeared as part of the “On a Winter's Night” tour and was part of Philo Records’ 25th Anniversary tour.  

  

Michael Johnson - Singer/songwriter Michael Johnson has been all over the map, ranging from folk to pop and soft rock to country. At 21, the Colorado native traveled to Barcelona and studied classical guitar with Graciano Tarrago. Returning to the U.S., he joined an incarnation of the Chad Mitchell Trio that included John Denver. After releasing three albums (yes, vinyl), for the Atco label in the mid-'70s, he signed with EMI in 1978. That year, he scored a No. 1 hit on the Adult Contemporary chart with "Bluer Than Blue" which almost made the pop Top 10. He also hit the Adult Contemporary Top Five with 1978's "Almost Like Being in Love" and 1979's "This Night Won't Last Forever." After five albums for EMI, he moved to RCA, where he adopted a contemporary country style and scored a total of five Top Ten country hits between 1986 and 1989, including the chart-toppers "Give Me Wings" and "The Moon Is Still Over Her Shoulder." Johnson continues to record for a number of independent labels.  

  

Lindsay Mac - Although Iowa native Lindsay Mac was classically trained in piano and cello when she was a child, it wasn’t until college that she considered music as a career. While studying medicine at Dartmouth, she entered the college's foreign study program and moved to London to study at the Royal College of Music. She briefly left Dartmouth to study at The San Francisco Conservatory - as well as to be a professional ski patroller in Utah and bike messenger. After graduating from Dartmouth, she enrolled in Berklee College of Music and began touring fulltime. Her second CD, "Stop Thinking," was named No. 2 in “Music Connection” magazine's Top 25 of 2008 and was featured on all American Airlines' flights beginning in January, 2009. The CD was also ranked No. 2 in Boston radio station WUMB’s 2009 list of “Top 10 Albums of The Year.” That same year, WFUV pickedy Mac as one of its “Artists You Need To Know,” along with Bell X1, Bon Iver, Duffy, Fleet Foxes and Ra Ra Riot. Her song "Cry, Cry, Cry" was a Finalist in the 2010 International Songwriting Competition. The 16 finalists were chosen from 15,000 entries. The song was also selected as a winner in the annual Billboard Song Contest, taking number three honors in the Pop category. 

  

Pat Donohue & Mary Flower – As guitarist for the Guys All-Star Shoe Band of Minnesota Public Radio’s “A Prairie Home Companion,” Pat Donohue has won praise from some heavy hitters: Chet Atkins called him one of the greatest finger pickers in the world today; Leo Kottke called his playing “haunting.” Playing for millions of listeners each week, Donohue’s decade-long association with Garrison Keillor’s popular program has led to some unusual gigs: jamming with Wynton Marsalis at the after-show club date in Berlin, and playing music on camera for the “Prairie Home Companion” movie with director Robert Altman and stars Meryl Streep. Donohue’s honors include a 2005 Grammy for his participation on “Pink Guitar,” a compilation of Henry Mancini tunes on acoustic guitar, several Minnesota Music Awards, and winning the 1983 National Finger Picking Guitar contest. His original tunes have been recorded by Chet Atkins, Suzy Bogguss and Kenny Rogers. Donohue has also been a featured performer at major music festivals including the Newport, Telluride and Philadelphia Folk Festivals.  

  

  

A world-class, finger-style guitarist, Mary Flower has twice placed in the top three at the prestigious National Finger Picking Championship in Winfield, KS – the only woman to do so. Moving to Denver from her native Indiana, Flower was part of the famed Mother Folkers, a collaborative of folk and blues players. She continues to be a highly regarded teacher and has instructed at venues including the Augusta Heritage Center and the Swannanoa Gathering. Since moving to Portland, OR, in 2004, Flower has become a regular on the blues and folk festival circuit and has performed at Merlefest, the Kerrville Folk Fest and the Winnipeg Folk Festival. She has released eight CDs, was nominated for a 2008 Blues Music Award, and won the Vox Populi award at the 2009 Independent Music Awards for the song “Slow Lane to Glory,” from her 2009 release “Bridges.” 

 

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